Actions Speak Louder Than Printed Words.

9 08 2013

If we have learned one thing from Orson Scott Card’s vocal bigotry against the LGBT community and the “Skip Ender’s Game” campaign (as launched by GeeksOUT), it is that a creator’s actions outside the scope of the work they are doing can, and WILL, effect said work regardless of the quality or merit of the finished product. From what I am told, Ender’s Game is quite a fantastic piece of literature and judging by the names attached to the cinematic adaptation, it stands to reason that the film will be quite a sci-fi spectacle as well. Thanks to Card’s deplorable, dehumanizing, and very public attitude towards a segment of the population, I won’t be shelling out my hard-earned gay money to help line his pockets.

With that being said, at what point do we, as a niche market (the LGBT community being an even smaller niche within that niche), separate the art from the artist? Is it even possible to do so when the artist chooses to squawk his reprehensible opinions in a manner such as Card’s? Representatives from Lionsgate Entertainment as well as members of the cast and production have stated that the film “should be judged on its message, not the personal beliefs of the author” and that Card’s views are “completely irrelevant” to the film adaptation.

My apologies to everyone involved in the production of Ender’s Game, but that is far easier said than done. While everyone is entitled to their opinions, however despicable they may be, there are always consequences to airing them out like so much dirty laundry and, unfortunately for Mr. Card and Lionsgate, they are seeing this firsthand.  

Separate the art from the artist. Sorry, it can’t be done… not completely… not 100%.

Meeting Gail Simone at Emerald City Comic Con 2013

Gail Simone at Emerald City Comic Con 2013

It’s a two-way street, however. For every one Orson Scott Card who has been shamed for his unpopular opinions and less-than-respectable character, there are plenty of artists who not only respect but appreciate their fans for their support. They are humble and excited to meet and talk with you. They are Marjorie Liu at Comicopia, Gail Simone at Emerald City Comic Con in Seattle, Marc and Bridget Silvestri playing with Will’s kids at Niagara Falls Comic Con, and Phil Jimenez excitedly joking about a Roulette/Danielle Moonstar miniseries involving a Las Vegas casino, a stripper pole, and free-flowing alcohol. 

These are the artists who will benefit from a fan’s inability to completely separate the art from the artist. These are the writers who will the focal points of stories that begin with “Remember how awesome it was to meet so-and-so?” and they are the creators whose new book might sell an extra copy to a fan they gave a hug to at a signing. 

Orson Scott Card will undoubtedly be playing the victim angle for the foreseeable future, especially if the box office sales for Ender’s Game are as low as his respect for cultural diversity. He would do well to remember that this PR catastrophe was his own doing and he is the cause for his art’s suffering. 

Like it or not, there is no undoing the connection between the art and the artist. Not only is that fine with me as a consumer but I am sure it is also fine with all those writers, pencillers, inkers, colorists, etc. whose wonderful personalities and character help their art flourish and succeed. And to those artists, we thank you… wholeheartedly.

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